Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bbcode.php on line 2958

Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bbcode.php on line 2958

Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bbcode.php on line 2958

Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bbcode.php on line 2958
Diccionarios y Definiciones: El tema de moda en París - Page 3
Página 3 de 5 PrimerPrimer 12345 ÚltimaÚltima
Mostrando resultados 31 a 45 de 66
  1. #31
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    octubre-2008
    Vengo de
    bulear a la perrada y luego volver a ella
    Babosadas escritas
    4,322


    + 2 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    El fabuloso mundo de los contrónimos, o las palabras que son su mismo antónimo


    Here’s an ambiguous sentence for you: “Because of the agency’s oversight, the corporation’s behavior was sanctioned.” Does that mean, 'Because the agency oversaw the company’s behavior, they imposed a penalty for some transgression' or does it mean, 'Because the agency was inattentive, they overlooked the misbehavior and gave it their approval by default'? We’ve stumbled into the looking-glass world of “contronyms”—words that are their own antonyms.

    1. Sanction
    (via French, from Latin sanctio(n-), from sancire ‘ratify,’) can mean ‘give official permission or approval for (an action)’ or conversely, ‘impose a penalty on.’
    *
    2. Oversight is the noun form of two verbs with contrary meanings, “oversee” and “overlook.” “Oversee,” from Old English ofersēon ‘look at from above,’ means ‘supervise’ (medieval Latin for the same thing: super- ‘over’ + videre ‘to see.’) “Overlook” usually means the opposite: ‘to fail to see or observe; to pass over without noticing; to disregard, ignore.’
    *
    3. Left can mean either remaining or departed. If the gentlemen have withdrawn to the drawing room for after-dinner cigars, who’s left? (The gentlemen have left and the ladies are left.)
    *
    4. Dust, along with the next two words, is a noun turned into a verb meaning either to add or to remove the thing in question. Only the context will tell you which it is. When you dust are you applying dust or removing it? It depends whether you’re dusting the crops or the furniture.
    *
    5. Seed can also go either way. If you seed the lawn you add seeds, but if you seed a tomato you remove them.
    *
    6. Stone is another verb to use with caution. You can stone some peaches, but please don’t stone your neighbor (even if he says he likes to get stoned).
    *
    7. Trim as a verb predates the noun, but it can also mean either adding or taking away. Arising from an Old English word meaning ‘to make firm or strong; to settle, arrange,’ “trim” came to mean ‘to prepare, make ready.’ Depending on who or what was being readied, it could mean either of two contradictory things: ‘to decorate something with ribbons, laces, or the like to give it a finished appearance’ or ‘to cut off the outgrowths or irregularities of.’ And the context doesn’t always make it clear. If you’re trimming the tree are you using tinsel or a chain saw?
    *
    8. Cleave can be cleaved into two “homographs,” words with different origins that end up spelled the same. “Cleave,” meaning ‘to cling to or adhere,’ comes from an Old English word that took the forms cleofian, clifian, or clīfan. “Cleave,” with the contrary meaning ‘to split or sever (something), ‘ as you might do with a cleaver, comes from a different Old English word, clēofan. The past participle has taken various forms: “cloven,” which survives in the phrase “cloven hoof,” “cleft,” as in a “cleft palate” or “cleaved.”
    *
    9. Resign works as a contronym in writing. This time we have homographs, but not homophones. “Resign,” meaning ‘to quit,’ is spelled the same as “resign,” meaning ‘to sign up again,’ but it’s pronounced differently.
    *
    10. Fast can mean "moving rapidly," as in "running fast," or ‘fixed, unmoving,’ as in "holding fast." If colors are fast they will not run. The meaning ‘firm, steadfast’ came first. The adverb took on the sense ‘strongly, vigorously,’ which evolved into ‘quickly,’ a meaning that spread to the adjective.
    *
    11. Off means ‘deactivated,’ as in "to turn off," but also ‘activated,’ as in "The alarm went off."
    *
    12. Weather can mean ‘to withstand or come safely through,’ as in “The company weathered the recession,” or it can mean ‘to be worn away’: “The rock was weathered.”
    *
    13. Screen can mean ‘to show’ (a movie) or ‘to hide’ (an unsightly view).
    *
    14. Help means ‘assist,’ unless you can’t help doing something, when it means ‘prevent.’
    *
    15. Clip can mean "to bind together" or "to separate." You clip sheets of paper to together or separate part of a page by clipping something out. Clip is a pair of homographs, words with different origins spelled the same. Old English clyppan, which means "to clasp with the arms, embrace, hug," led to our current meaning, "to hold together with a clasp." The other clip, "to cut or snip (a part) away," is from Old Norse klippa, which may come from the sound of a shears.
    *
    16. Continue usually means to persist in doing something, but as a legal term it means stop a proceeding temporarily.
    *
    17. Fight with can be interpreted three ways. “He fought with his mother-in-law” could mean "They argued," "They served together in the war," or "He used the old battle-ax as a weapon." (Thanks to linguistics professor Robert Hertz for this idea.)
    *
    18. Flog, meaning "to punish by caning or whipping," shows up in school slang of the 17th century, but now it can have the contrary meaning, "to promote persistently," as in “flogging a new book.” Perhaps that meaning arose from the sense ‘to urge (a horse, etc.) forward by whipping,’ which grew out of the earliest meaning.
    *
    19. Go means "to proceed," but also "give out or fail," i.e., “This car could really go until it started to go.”
    *
    20. Hold up can mean "to support" or "to hinder": “What a friend! When I’m struggling to get on my feet, he’s always there to hold me up.”
    *
    21. Out can mean "visible" or "invisible." For example, “It’s a good thing the full moon was out when the lights went out.”
    *
    22. Out of means "outside" or "inside": “I hardly get out of the house because I work out of my home.”
    *
    23. Bitch, as reader Shawn Ravenfire pointed out, can derisively refer to a woman who is considered overly aggressive or domineering, or it can refer to someone passive or submissive.
    *
    24. Peer is a person of equal status (as in a jury of one’s peers), but some peers are more equal than others, like the members of the peerage, the British or Irish nobility.
    *
    25. Toss out could be either "to suggest" or "to discard": “I decided to toss out the idea.”


    The contronym (also spelled “contranym”) goes by many names, including “auto-antonym,” “antagonym,” “enantiodrome,” “self-antonym,” “antilogy” and “Janus word” (from the Roman god of beginnings and endings, often depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions). Can’t get enough of them? The folks at Daily Writing Tips have rounded up even more.

    x1000

  2. #32
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    junio-2007
    Vengo de
    el verbo Vengar.
    Babosadas escritas
    36,154


    + 2 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Ico 11 Salchichas ML,NLL: La etimología del idioma español vs. el feminismo victimizante.

    Fregado, esto es más sobre etimologías que sobre diccionarios pero me pareció interesante por lo bien estructurado que es y por ser un porqué del hecho que el choro del "constructo lingüístico opresor, nefaria obra del heteropatriarcado" que me re-zurra las bolas es un argumento muy muy débil que raya en la ignorancia, que llega a casos extremos con esos mangoneos arbitrarios que hacen algunas/os feministas al escribir, usando aberraciones como ustedxs en vez de ustedes, con tal de sentirse en un paraíso personal de lo correcto que es sólo opio de tres varos.

    Copiado y pegado de un texto de ayer de Marisa Echevarría, re-publicado por Doña Cuca.

    Ninguna mano machista meció la cuna del genérico masculino.

    La lengua no es sexista, el sexista es el hablante. Si bien es cierto que palabras como "zorro" tienen una franca acepción sexista en su forma femenina, el problema no es de la lengua, sino del hablante. Es decir, el sistema no decide la connotación sexista de la palabra, sino quien la usa.
    No cabe duda de que la lucha por los derechos de la mujer –así como otras luchas por los derechos humanos es una lucha que debemos librar, pero no es al sistema lingüístico al que debemos atacar.

    Los sistemas lingüísticos tienen reglas internas que no son decididas por los hombres; son fenómenos del tercer tipo. Los fenómenos del primer tipo son los fenómenos naturales; los del segundo, son fenómenos causados por el hombre con la inatención (SIC) de provocarlos, y los terceros, son fenómenos causados por el hombre, pero sin la intención de provocarlos. Es decir, el hombre comenzó a hablar con la intención de comunicarse, pero nunca tuvo la intención de crear un sistema lingüístico.

    Así pues, los bichos lingüísticos comenzaron a crecer y transformarse, incluso a reproducirse. Es el caso del latín que produjo las lenguas romances, entre las cuales está el español. Estas lenguas evolucionaron a partir del latín que se hablaba en las calles y no en los monasterios; es decir, brotaron del latín vulgar, del latín del pueblo.

    Hartos fenómenos fonológicos empezaron a hacer de las suyas en el latín vulgar, llegando al grado de unificar todos los casos que tenían los sustantivos en el latín culto. ¿Se han fijado como en algunos dialectos del español, por ejemplo, el veracruzano, el cubano, el puertorriqueño, la -s del plural tiende a desaparecer y dicen ellos muy alegremente: "la' cosa''"? (La ' es una pequeña aspiración que todavía hacen). Pues lo mismo sucedió en en latín.

    El latín tenía cinco clases de sustantivos que terminaban en cada una de las vocales; había, pues, sustantivos que terminaban en -o, -a, -i, -u, -e. Pero además, cada clase tenía seis casos y dos números. Nos cuesta mucho entender el asunto de los casos de sustantivos, pero equiparémoslos con los verbos. Si yo digo "corro", la -o indica que soy yo quien corre y que lo estoy haciendo en este momento; mientras que si digo "corrió", -io indica que es una tercera persona quien corrió y que lo hizo antes de hoy. Lo mismo era en latín con los sustantivos; había una terminación para indicar que el sustantivo era sujeto, otra para señalar que era objeto directo, otra para el indirecto, una para el vocativo, otra para indicar la circunstancia y una para posesión. (Debo aclarar que esta es una clasificación muy simplificada que uso nada más para ejemplificar.)
    Entonces, tenemos que en latín los sustantivos estaban clasificados en cinco categorías y en cada una de ellas había 6 casos y dos números, puesto que cada caso tenía su correspondiente plural.
    Y para complicar el asunto, en latín había tres géneros: masculino, femenino y neutro.

    Como ya dije, los fenómenos fonológicos que nadie decidió que existieran, pero que siguen existiendo provocaron la pérdida de los casos del latín; es decir, al igual que la "s" del plural se pierde en ideolectos del español, en latín se perdió la -m, la ā y la ă se fusionaron, así como la ī y la ĭ, etc. Para acabarla de amolar, las terminaciones de los sustantivos que terminaban en cada una de las vocales se redujeron a tres: -a, -e, -o
    El resultado fue que se perdieron los casos del sustantivo y nada más quedó el número: quedaron sustantivos con singular y plural y ¡género!
    Les tengo que comunicar que el género neutro también fue avasallado por estos cambios fonológicos y morfológicos; es decir, son cambios formales y, les aseguro, que ningún macho los decidió.

    Entonces, ¿dónde quedaron los sustantivo neutros en el sistema que se estaba conformando? Pues hicieron lo que pudieron. Dependiendo de qué clase eran y cuál era su terminación se fueron formando los sustantivos masculinos y femeninos; así de los neutros ANNUS*, PRATUM y VINUS se formaron año, prado y vino, y de OPUS->OPERA, obra.
    El resultado de este proceso que, por cierto, duró cinco siglos es que se formaron más sustantivo masculinos que femeninos. Por lo tanto, como cualquier oposición en el sistema, el elemento más productivo es el no marcado, es el genérico. Sucede lo mismo con la oposición singular-plural; el elemento no marcado es el singular porque es el más productivo, y en las terminaciones verbales el genérico es -ar por la misma razón.

    Les puedo asegurar que ninguna mente machista, ni siquiera Alfonso El Sabio, decidió que el género no marcado fuera el masculino.
    Cuando los hablantes de español, a través de un largo proceso, cambien el genérico a femenino o a neutro, pues así será; pero, mientras tanto, no confundamos la política con el sistema de la lengua y dejemos que los fenómenos del tercer tipo sucedan.


    *
    JAJAJA: DIJO ANNUS

  3. #33
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    junio-2007
    Vengo de
    el verbo Vengar.
    Babosadas escritas
    36,154


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Y una pequeña acotación más que hace la mujer a manera de comentario/diálogo con otras personas refiriéndose al mismo tema:

    (...) tanto en la oposición de género como en la de número, el término no marcado es incluyente, mientras que el marcado es excluyente. Si digo "niños" me refiero a niños y niñas, pero si digo "niñas" excluyo a los niños. De la misma manera, si digo "Todos aquí son alegres" me refiero a las personas aquí presentes, pero si digo "Todo aquí es alegre" incluyo a las cosas aquí presentes.

  4. #34
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    diciembre-2013
    Vengo de
    Limpiarme con el dedo
    Babosadas escritas
    883


    + 1 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Esperando pacientemente que venga la Marmota a argumentar que los que inventaron los términos en latín, seguramente eran una bola de machistas retrogradas y de paso darle una patada en los huevos a Tamales Morsa con su bota feminazi.

  5. #35
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    junio-2007
    Vengo de
    el verbo Vengar.
    Babosadas escritas
    36,154


    + 1 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Para eso ya tenemos Féisbuc.

  6. #36
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    octubre-2008
    Vengo de
    bulear a la perrada y luego volver a ella
    Babosadas escritas
    4,322


    + 1 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    66 datos inútiles sobre el idioma Inglés


    1. In the 17th century, magpies were nicknamed pie-maggots.
    2. The part of a wall between two windows is called the interfenestration.
    3. If you were to write out every number name in full (one, two, three, four...), you wouldn't use a single letter B until you reached one billion.
    4. The part of your back that you can't quite reach to scratch is called the acnestis.It's derived from the Greek word for "cheese-grater."
    5. A hecatompedon is a building measuring precisely 100ft × 100ft.
    6. A growlery is a place you like to retire to when you're unwell or in a bad mood. It was coined by Charles Dickens in Bleak House (1853).
    7. There was no word for the color orange in English until about 450 years ago.
    8. The infinity sign, ∞, is called a lemniscate. Its name means "decorated with ribbons" in Latin.
    9. A Dutch feast is one at which the host gets drunk before his hosts do.
    10. Schoolmaster is an anagram of "the classroom."
    11. To explode originally meant "to jeer a performer off the stage."
    12. Funk was originally a Tudor word for the stale smell of tobacco smoke.
    13. In written English, only one letter in every 510 is a Q.
    14. The opposite of déjà-vu is called jamais-vu: it describes the odd feeling that something very familiar is actually completely new.
    15. A scissor was originally a type of Roman gladiator thought to have been armed either with a pair of swords or blades, or with a single dual-bladed dagger.
    16. To jirble means "to spill a liquid while pouring it because your hands are shaking."
    17. Samuel Johnson defined a sock as "something put between the foot and the shoe."
    18. In Victorian slang, muffin-wallopers were old unmarried or widowed women who would meet up to gossip over tea and cakes.
    19. Scarecrows were once known as hobidy-boobies.
    20. The longest English word with its letters in reverse alphabetical order isspoonfeed.
    21. Shakespeare used the word puking in As You Like It.
    22. Flabellation is the use of a fan to cool something down.
    23. Bamboozle derives from a French word, embabouiner, meaning "to make a baboon out of someone."
    24. A percontation is a question that requires more than a straightforward "yes" or "no" answer.
    25. The shortest -ology is oology, the scientific study of eggs.
    26. As a verb rather than a noun, owl means "to act wisely, despite knowing nothing."
    27. A shape with 99 sides would be called an enneacontakaienneagon.
    28. In the 18th century, a clank-napper was a thief who specialized in stealing silverware.
    29. Noon is derived from the Latin for "ninth," novem. It originally referred to the ninth hour of the Roman day -- 3pm.
    30. 11% of the entire English language is just the letter E.
    31. Oysterhood means "reclusiveness," or "an overwhelming desire to stay at home."
    32. A puckfist is someone who braggingly dominates a conversation.
    33. The bowl formed by cupping your hands together is called a gowpen.
    34. To battologize means "to repeat a word so incessantly in conversation that it loses all meaning and impact."
    35. A zoilist is an unfair or unnecessarily harsh critic, or someone who particularly enjoys finding fault in things.
    36. In 19th century English, a cover-slut was a long cloak or overcoat worn to hide a person's untidy or dirty clothes underneath.
    37. Happy is used three times more often in English than sad.
    38. Trinkgeld is money meant only to be spent on drink.
    39. Aquabob is an old name for an icicle.
    40. In the 16th and 17th century, buttock-mail was the name of a tax once levied in Scotland on people who had sex out of wedlock.
    41. Witzelsucht is a rare neurological disorder whose sufferers have an excessive tendency to tell pointless stories or inappropriate jokes and puns.
    42. A repdigit is a number comprised of a series of repeated numbers, like 9,999.
    43. In Tudor English, a gandermooner was a man who flirted with other women while his wife recovered from childbirth.
    44. A cumberground is an utterly useless person who literally serves no other purpose than to take up space.
    45. Sermocination is the proper name for posing a question and then immediately answering it yourself.
    46. The earliest known reference to baseball in English comes from Jane Austen'sNorthanger Abbey (1798).
    47. Whipper-tooties are pointless misgivings or groundless excuses for not trying to do something.
    48. Anything described as transpontine is located on the opposite side of a bridge.
    49. In the early days of Hollywood, the custard pies thrown in comedy sketches were nicknamed magoos.
    50. Checkbook is the longest horizontally symmetrical word in the English language -- although if proper nouns are included, Florida's Lake Okeechobee is one letter longer.
    51. The earliest record of the phrase "do-it-yourself" comes from a 1910 magazine article about students at Boston University being left to teach themselves.
    52. The paddywhack mentioned in the nursery rhyme "This Old Man" is a Victorian slang word for a severe beating.
    53. The Kelvin temperature scale, the forsythia plant, Boeing aircraft and the state of Pennsylvania are all named after people called William.
    54. Xenoglossy is the apparent ability to speak a language that you've never actually learned.
    55. Mochas are named after a port in Yemen, from where coffee was exported to Europe in the 18th century.
    56. In mediaeval Europe, a moment was precisely 1/40th of an hour, or 90 seconds.
    57. To quomodocunquize means "to make money by whatever means possible."
    58. Porpoise literally means "pork-fish."
    59. Shivviness is an old Yorkshire word for the uncomfortable feeling of wearing new underwear.
    60. The adjectival form of abracadabra is abracadabrant, used to describe anything that has apparently happened by magic.
    61. Straitjackets were originally called strait-waistcoats.
    62. Aspirin and heroin were both originally trademarks. They lost their trademark status as part of the Treaty of Versailles.
    63. An autological word is one that describes itself -- like short or unhyphenated.
    64. In the 18th century, teachers were nicknamed "haberdashers of pronouns."
    65. The burnt or used part of a candlewick is called the snaste.
    66. The expressions "bully pulpit" and "lunatic fringe" were coined by Theodore Roosevelt.

  7. #37
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    octubre-2008
    Vengo de
    bulear a la perrada y luego volver a ella
    Babosadas escritas
    4,322


    + 1 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    En todos los siglos se cuecen habas

    31 Adorable Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse from the Last 600 Years


    Lexicographer Jonathon Green’s comprehensive historical dictionary of slang, Green’s Dictionary of Slang, covers hundreds of years of jargon, cant, and naughty talk. He has created a series of online timelines (here and here) where the words too impolite, indecent, or risqué for the usual history books are arranged in the order they came into fashion. (If you don’t see any words on the timelines, zoom out using the bar on the right.) We’ve already had fun with the classiest terms for naughty bits. Here are the most adorable terms for sexual intercourse from the last 600 or so years. Many of them have origins so obscure they hardly make sense at all, but that doesn’t detract from their bawdy adorability in the slightest. When it comes to the ol’ houghmagandy, a little mystery goes a long way.

    1. Give someone a green gown (1351)

    2. Play nug-a-nug (1505)

    3. Play the pyrdewy (1512)

    4. Play at couch quail (1521)

    5. Ride below the crupper (1578)

    6. Board a land carrack (1604)

    7. Fadoodling (1611)

    8. Put the devil into hell (1616)

    9. Night physic (1621)

    10. Princum-prancum (1630)

    11. Culbatizing exercise (1653)

    12. Join paunches (1656)

    13. Dance the Paphian jig (1656)

    14. Play at tray trip of a die (1660)

    15. Dance Barnaby (1664)

    16. Shot twixt wind and water (1665)

    17. Play at rantum-scantum (1667)

    18. Blow off the groundsills (1674)

    19. Play hey gammer cook (1674)

    20. Join giblets (1680)

    21. Play at rumpscuttle and clapperdepouch (1684)

    22. Lerricompoop (1694)

    23. Ride a dragon upon St. George (1698)

    24. Houghmagandy (1700)

    25. Pogue the hone (1719)

    26. Make feet for children’s stockings (1785)

    27. Dance the kipples (1796)

    28. Have one’s corn ground (1800)

    29. Horizontal refreshment (1863)

    30. Arrive at the end of the sentimental journey (1896)

    31. Get one’s ashes hauled (1910)

  8. #38
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    octubre-2008
    Vengo de
    bulear a la perrada y luego volver a ella
    Babosadas escritas
    4,322


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Palabras intraducibles, ahora ilustradas

    1. Fernweh (German)

    2. Komorebi (Japanese)

    3. Tingo (Pascuense)

    4. Pochemuchka (Russian)



    5. Gökotta (Swedish)

    6. Bakku-shan (Japanese)

    7. Backpfeifengesicht (German)

    8. Aware (Japanese)

    9. Tsundoku (Japanese)

    10. Shlimazl (Yiddish)

    11. Rire dans sa barbe (French)

    12. Waldeinsamkeit (German)

    13. Hanyauku (Rukwangali)



    14. Gattara (Italian) Aunque ésa sí tiene traducción: "La vieja loca de los gatos"



    15. Prozvonit (Czech)


    16. Iktsuarpok (Inuit)

    17. Papakata (Cook Islands Maori)



    18. Friolero (Spanish) - ¿Que no es "friolento"?


    19. Schilderwald (German)

    20. Utepils (Norwegian)

    21. Mamihlapinatapei (Yagan)

    22. Culaccino (Italian)

    23. Ilunga (Tshiluba)

    24. Kyoikumama (Japanese)

    25. Age-otori (Japanese)


    26. Chai-Pani (Hindi) - O "mordida". La verdad está medio pendeja ésta lista
    ¬¬
    27. Won (Korean)

    28. Tokka (Finnish)

    29. Schadenfreude (German)

    30. Wabi-Sabi (Japanese)


  9. #39
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    junio-2007
    Vengo de
    el verbo Vengar.
    Babosadas escritas
    36,154


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Tingo = Mexicanada

  10. #40
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    abril-2014
    Vengo de
    reírme de lo que no debo.
    Babosadas escritas
    1,214


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Hablando de palabras intraducibles a otros idiomas porque solo se entienden en le contexto de una cultura tenemos el muy mexicano término de "charolazo" que es enseñar una identificación oficial con el propósito de obtener privilegios o evadir la acción de las leyes.


  11. #41
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    octubre-2008
    Vengo de
    bulear a la perrada y luego volver a ella
    Babosadas escritas
    4,322


    + 1 Galletas

    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Cómo lombrar alimanes en Anemál


  12. #42
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    agosto-2014
    Vengo de
    darle gusto a tu coprofílica jefa
    Babosadas escritas
    3,793


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Viene de tesoro pero se usa como diccionario.

    Tesauro.

    (Del lat. thesaurus, y este del gr. θησαυρός).

    1. m. desus. tesoro (‖ diccionario, catálogo).

    2. m. ant. tesoro.

  13. #43
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    agosto-2014
    Vengo de
    darle gusto a tu coprofílica jefa
    Babosadas escritas
    3,793


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    Algún fotochopistamateur tiene una página con las 20 palabras mas bonitas del español.

    http://www.elciudadano.cl/2015/03/13...dioma-espanol/


    Concuerdo solo con algunas:














    Palabras nuevas para mí:
    RAE
    melifluo, flua.

    (Del lat. melliflŭus, que destila miel).

    1. adj. Que tiene miel o es parecido a ella en sus propiedades.

    2. adj. Dulce, suave, delicado y tierno en el trato o en la manera de hablar. U. m. en sent. peyor.






    No está todavía en la RAE. Anglicismo.

  14. #44
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    junio-2007
    Vengo de
    el verbo Vengar.
    Babosadas escritas
    36,154


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado

    El mundo en que vivía ha sido dinamitado.


  15. #45
    Entró a Lé Foro desde
    agosto-2014
    Vengo de
    darle gusto a tu coprofílica jefa
    Babosadas escritas
    3,793


    +1 Galleta |

    Predeterminado



    http://www.perfil.com/cultura/Por-qu...0430-0029.html

    "Al tratarse de un diccionario general de lengua, no puede registrar todo el léxico del español, sino que, por fuerza, debe contentarse con acoger una selección de nuestro código verbal. Esta selección será lo más completa en lo que se refiere al léxico de la lengua culta, mientras que en otros aspectos -dialectalismos españoles, americanos y filipinos, tecnicismos, vulgarismos y coloquialismos, arcaísmos, etc.- se limitará a incorporar una representación de los usos más extendidos o característicos"

    "Deben abarcar al menos seis o siete años, pues de otro modo, podrían reflejar un uso pasajero"






    Siendo así, en un par de años la RAE va a incluir NOBIA en su diccionario. Putos.

Discusiones similares

  1. Qué naco, eso no está de moda entre los que odiamos la moda.
    Por lovely en el forucho Desmadre General. El rincón del rocanrol y el rolón en el avión buena onda chavorol.
    Respuestas: 55
    Babosadas más recientes: 14-jun-2014, 07:08
  2. Moda 2010
    Por El Hombre Embudo en el forucho Kínder "Mártires de Tlajomulco" Readaptación Internetz A.C.
    Respuestas: 13
    Babosadas más recientes: 21-nov-2010, 03:46
  3. Chuparé tu caca si me das pene.Chuparé tu caca si me das pene.Chuparé tu caca si me das pene.... moda gatuna??!!!
    Por zacil en el forucho Desmadre General. El rincón del rocanrol y el rolón en el avión buena onda chavorol.
    Respuestas: 8
    Babosadas más recientes: 20-feb-2008, 08:13
  4. Compendio de terminologia, anglicismos, naquicismos definiciones y otras cosas utilizadas en leforo
    Por Heck en el forucho Desmadre General. El rincón del rocanrol y el rolón en el avión buena onda chavorol.
    Respuestas: 1
    Babosadas más recientes: 26-mar-2007, 06:48
  5. La Moda Zombie!
    Por Nash en el forucho Desmadre General. El rincón del rocanrol y el rolón en el avión buena onda chavorol.
    Respuestas: 8
    Babosadas más recientes: 12-ene-2007, 02:25

Etiquetas de este temazo

Marcadores cucos

Marcadores cucos

Reglas del foro

  • No puedes hacer temas nuevos. Culpa a la talidomida o algo.
  • No puedes responder a ningún tema
  • Archivos adjuntos deshabilitados
  • No puedes editar tus escritos
  •